Types of Studies

PSG: Polysomnography (sleep study) is a non-invasive, pain-free diagnostic test that record a person’s brain waves (EEG), eye movements (EOG), heart rate and rhythm (EKG), respiratory effort and airflow (respiratory function), oxygen levels and muscle activity.

PSG with CPAP Titration: Patients diagnosed with sleep problems during the first night diagnostic study may need to return to the sleep center for a second night study called CPAP titration.  The most common treatment of Sleep Apnea is a medical device known as Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP).  The CPAP device applies air pressure to the upper airway and acts as a splint to keep the airway open.  Each patient must have the proper CPAP pressure calibrated in order to treat his or her specific needs.  The majority of people with Sleep Apnea are easily treated.

MSLT: Multiple Sleep Latency Test (daytime study): A multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) is conducted, along with a polysomnogram, to confirm or rule out narcolepsy. It is a test done during the daytime that monitors a series of naps to reveal a person’s severity of sleepiness and whether REM sleep (deep sleep during which a person dreams) intrudes inappropriately throughout waking hours. The test is usually done immediately after an overnight study. You will remain wired with most of the wires from the polysomnogram done the night before. A series of five naps are taken at two-hour intervals. The test is usually done by 5 p.m. There is little or no discomfort from the MSLT. The MSLT is the benchmark standard for screening for narcolepsy.

MWT: Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (daytime study): A Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) is conducted along with a polysomnogram to determine your level of daytime sleepiness after treatment for narcolepsy or sleep apnea. This test is generally used for commercial drivers, pilots and people who work around heavy equipment to ascertain ability to perform their job safely. The test is usually done immediately after an overnight study. You will remain wired with most of the wires from the polysomnogram done the night before. A series of four “naps” are taken at two-hour intervals. Each nap requires the patient to sit in a chair for 40 minutes and try to remain awake. The test is usually done by 5 p.m. There is little or no discomfort from the MWT.